Slide TIRE
RECYCLING
PROGRESS REPORT

TIRE SUPPLIERS’ RECYCLING ROLE

When Albertans get new tires, they usually leave their old ones behind. They can because 2,200 vehicle and tire dealers and auto repair shops play a dual role – selling new tires and making sure the old scrap tires you leave behind are collected for recycling at Alberta facilities.

RECYCLING RESULTS

This chart presents results over the last five years. This year there was a 7.8% decrease over the previous year, mainly due to a reduction in the cyclical demand for tire-derived aggregate in landfill projects.

ALBERTANS ARE GETTING GREAT MILEAGE FROM THEIR TIRE RECYCLING PROGRAM WITH $14.5 MILLION IN GRANTS

Across the province you will find recycled tire products in 598 Municipal Demonstration Grant Projects such as playgrounds, arenas, outdoor fitness areas and walking trails. Additionally 190 Indigenous communities and municipalities have received funding to upgrade their tire collection areas located at landfills and transfer stations.

ENVIRONMENTAL FEES AT WORK

The environmental fees that Albertans pay when buying new tires are used to help fund the collection and recycling of this material along with other Program-related costs. There are 3,050 tire producers and suppliers registered with ARMA who collect these fees on the sale of each eligible product sold in Alberta and remit the funds to ARMA. We value their commitment and diligence as part of the frontline of the tire recycling program.

ALBERTANS SUPPORT
THE TIRE RECYCLING PROGRAM

Albertans are regularly polled to measure their support for the program. While percentages have dipped by
7% over the last five years, the most recent result of 83% is still a strong showing of support.

Recycling Expenditures0%

Collection and recycling of tires

Recycling Development0%

R&D; Program awareness

Program Delivery Expenditures0%

Costs to deliver the program

Corporate Administration0%

Corporate costs

This chart breaks out the amount of tires processed by type for the past four years. Tires vary in size and weight, therefore a standardized unit is applied to present the results, using a passenger-tire-equivalent (PTE) of one PTE equalling 10 kgs. There is 100 PTEs in one tonne of tires.

ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS FOR RECYCLERS

A goal of the Tire Program is to ensure all scrap tires are collected and processed by registered Recyclers in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. Monthly inspections by Alberta Recycling and an environmental audit by external experts every three years, confirm if the Recyclers are following the requirements of the Program.

WHAT HAPPENS TO
YOUR SCRAP TIRES

Two registered recyclers coordinate the collection of scrap tires from 2,200 vehicle and tire dealers, auto repair shops and 350 tire recycling depots in 128 participating municipalities. Since 2002 4-H clubs have partnered with Alberta Recycling to clean up rural areas, collecting 1.16 million tires for which they have received funding per tire.

STAGE 1

Tires are shred into large pieces for use as tire-derived aggregate (TDA). The steel and fibre are still embedded.

APPLICATION:
TDA is a cost-effective alternative to conventional aggregate (a limited and non-renewable resource) for use in leachate drainage blankets.

STAGE 2

Shred is ground to make mulch, with the steel removed.

APPLICATION:
Landscaping.

STAGE 3

Tires are processed into crumb with the steel and fibre removed.

APPLICATION:
Playground surfaces, various molded products, synthetic turf and athletic tracks.

ARMA oversees end-of-life processing of tires, electronics, paint and used oil materials on behalf of the province. Since 1992, ARMA has worked with a broad spectrum of stakeholders to shape recycling policy, create a value-added processing system, minimize waste entering landfills and to act as collective stewards of Alberta’s environment.